Lincoln High School Statesman

New year, new me?: Why New Year’s resolutions suck

Common+New+Year%27s+resolutions+are+eating+healthier%2C+exercising+more+and+saving+money.
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New year, new me?: Why New Year’s resolutions suck

Common New Year's resolutions are eating healthier, exercising more and saving money.

Common New Year's resolutions are eating healthier, exercising more and saving money.

Photo provided by Lauren Teller

Common New Year's resolutions are eating healthier, exercising more and saving money.

Photo provided by Lauren Teller

Photo provided by Lauren Teller

Common New Year's resolutions are eating healthier, exercising more and saving money.

Lauren Teller, Opinion Editor

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Each year on Jan 1, a large majority of Americans will be joining new gyms, starting new projects and laying down their vices in the name of self-improvement, hoping to quit bad habits or begin new ones abruptly.

However, as the year changes, many people repeat the same cycle of succumbing to the temptations and struggles that their unrealistic resolutions bring. They begin the period of 365 days overlooking a new horizon, with bright eyes and a false security of unwavering commitment to their “new beginning” so to speak. Slowly and surely, they fall victim to the New Year’s resolution that will haunt them and guilt them into the cycle once again.

In 2019, my New Year’s resolution is to not make a resolution. I am a fan of goal setting, but find more success in consistent evolution, preferring to stay self-aware no matter what the calendar date is. By setting a resolution, I think that people find themselves feeling guilty or failing, when they struggle to abide by their life changes. The typical resolutions of taking on and giving up habit behaviors are big changes with little transition, which often causes you to ditch that resolution of “I’m going to go to the gym every day”.

Another aspect to consider in the grand scheme of resolutions is reflection on the previous year. If a resolution is something that you feel needs to take place, looking back on what was successful and what was not can help revive your outlook on life and determine if the proposed resolution is appropriate.

Resolutions should not be stress-inducing, but rather revitalizing for the year to come.

 

How do you feel about New Year’s resolutions?

  1. Do you set New Year’s resolutions/have you ever? Why or why not?
  2. What type of resolution do you set?
  3. How long does it usually last?

 

Jacob Aspaas, 9:

  1. “Yes, I did have a New Year’s resolution this year, which was to drink more water every day. I think that this was a good resolution because I find myself hungry or thirsty during the day and usually it’s just water that my body is looking for. I am still doing the resolution and I am happy that I have followed through with it for as long as I have.”

 

Eden Hodgins, 10:

  1. “Sometimes, my family kind of does it, but we do more of a goal or something we would like to do in the year instead of a die-hard commitment.”
  2. “I can’t really remember but it was probably something like be nice to my siblings when I was younger or more recently practice or read the Bible more often.”
  3. “Most likely, less than a week. Somehow, I seem to take New Year’s resolutions way less seriously than I do normal goals.”
Author
Lauren Teller, Opinion Editor

Lauren Teller is a junior and second-year Statesman staff member. Aside from her time spent hanging out in the j-lab, Lauren is an active member of the...

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